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Artikel Publication logo Juni 21, 2022

Bruno’s Adopted City in the Amazon Reflects His Loss (Portuguese)

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This story excerpt was translated from Portuguese. To read the original story in full, visit Agência Pública. You may also view the original story on the Rainforest Journalism Fund website here. Our website is available in English, Spanish, bahasa Indonesia, French, and Portuguese.


When Bruno returned from boat trips to the Vale do Javari Indigenous Land, one of his stops in Atalaia do Norte (AM) was at "seu" Rosedilson Barroso Salvador's small wooden restaurant, where he would drink a mocotó broth and ask to listen to country music, especially by the duo Milionário e José Rico. A Roberto Carlos fan, Rosedilson has saved on his computer a selected repertoire of hits from the 60s and 70s that he plays non-stop.

"He used to go up this street by the port and sit where you are sitting. He always asked if Sport was playing, if they were going to play. When there was a game, he would ask to turn on the TV and ask for an Itaipava [beer]," said Rosedilson. Born in Pernambuco, the indigenous man was a fan of Sport de Recife (PE). He lived about five years in Atalaia, from 2012 to 2016, when he left the regional coordination of Funai. From 2020 he returned to the city after becoming a consultant for Univaja, the main entity for indigenous people in the region, and started helping to organize indigenous surveillance teams.


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Bruno also used to eat lunch at Dona Dila's restaurant. On June 2, according to José "Pacu," the owner's husband, he ate two fried fish and four soft drinks with the journalist Dom Phillips. It was their last meal in Atalaia before continuing their trip down the Itaquaí river, from which they would never return.

"I didn't know that Dom was such an important person, if I had known I would have gone to talk to him," said José, showing the notebook with Bruno's request. On the paper a fish is written down, matrinchã, but at the last minute they changed the order to tambaqui. "Bruno was calm, a good person. He was doing his job. It's like the guys at Funai, they are employees. They do their job."


Rosedilson Salvador remembers the conversations he had with Bruno in his restaurant and laments his friend's death. Image courtesy of José Medeiros/Agência Pública. Brazil, 2022.

Bruno and Dom's last meal at Dona Dila's restaurant in Atalaia do Norte. Image courtesy of José Medeiros/Agência Pública. Brazil, 2022.

The farm that Bruno and other Funai employees bought together. Image courtesy of José Medeiros/Agência Pública. Brazil, 2022.

The farm that Bruno and other Funai employees bought together. Image courtesy of José Medeiros/Agência Pública. Brazil, 2022.

Jaime Mayuruna lives with his family in the house ceded by the indigenous leader. Image courtesy of José Medeiros/Agência Pública. Brazil, 2022.

Some of Bruno's books that were in his farm. Image courtesy of José Medeiros/Agência Pública. Brazil, 2022.