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Reportagem Publication logo Junho 20, 2022

When Communities Take Part in Restoring National Parks (bahasa Indonesia)

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A man cuts down a tree.
Inglês

Communities work to regrow the forest by planting trees. Some efforts paid off, but challenges...

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This story excerpt was translated from bahasa Indonesia. To read the original story in full, visit Mongabay Indonesia. You may also view the original story on the Rainforest Journalism Fund website here. Our website is available in English, Spanish, bahasa Indonesia, French, and Portuguese.



Image courtesy of Mongabay Indonesia. Indonesia, 2022.
  • Forest destruction in national parks occurs because of illegal logging, animal poaching, forest fires to illegal mining and others. Recovery efforts are underway, such as in Tanjung Puting and Way Kambas National Parks. The involvement of communities around the area is very important in these restoration efforts.
  • Pesalat Forest, in Tanjung Puting National Park (TNTP), Central Kalimantan, is a portrait of successful area restoration. The once-damaged forest is now lush. There are agarwood, meranti, jelutong, ulin, ramin, nyatuh, and other endemic plants. The dense canopy allows small 'windows' for the sun to enter.
  • Way Kambas National Park, Lampung, experiences recurrent fires. Poaching often fuels the fires. Kuswandono, Head of the Way Kambas National Park Center, said that forest fires are the biggest challenge in the area, around 80-90%. Recovery efforts have been made by involving parties which include the surrounding community.
  • Elisabeth Devi Krismurniati, Head of Data Affairs, Monitoring Evaluation, Reports, and Business Licensing of the Way Kambas National Park Office, said that critical land in Was Kambas reached 30%, or around 37,000 hectares, from an area of around 125,000 hectares.

The trees are lush. There are gaharu, meranti, jelutung, ulin, ramin, nyatuh and other endemic plants. The tight canopy allows small 'windows' for the sun to enter. People usually call this area the Pesalat forest. The area in Tanjung Puting National Park (TNTP), Central Kalimantan was previously severely damaged, and is now recovering.


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In this national park, there are areas that have returned to dense forests such as Pesalat, but some are still in recovery efforts such as Natai Tengah.

Pesalat became a dense forest cover due to the hard work of the surrounding community, beginning three decades ago.

Video by Mongabay Indonesia. Indonesia, 2022.
Graph by Mongabay Indonesia. Indonesia, 2022.
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A medicinal plant demonstration plot in Pesalat. Restoration in this area was quite successful by turning the area that was once weeds into forest again. Image by Lusia Arumingtyas / Mongabay Indonesia. Indonesia, 2022.
Graph by Mongabay Indonesia. Source: Sumber: Balai TN Tanjung Puting. Indonesia, 2022.
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Nursery location in Natai Tengah. Image by Lusia Arumingtyas / Mongabay Indonesia. Indonesia, 2022.

Restoration area in Rawa Kidang, Way Kambas National Park with dominant plants using rhinos. Image by Lusia Arumingtyas / Mongabay Indonesia. Indonesia, 2022.

Bambangan restoration area in Way Kambas. Image by Lusia Arumingtyas / Mongabay Indonesia. Indonesia, 2022.

Nursery site at Rawa kadut, Way Kambas. Image by Lusia Arumingtyas / Mongabay Indonesia. Indonesia, 2022.

Forest restoration in Rawa Purwa, Way Kambas. Image courtesy of AleRT. Indonesia, 2022.

Elephants in Way Kambas. In addition, there are other endemic, rare and protected animals that live in this area such as Sumatran tigers and rhinos. Image courtesy of Mongabay Indonesia. Indonesia, 2022.
Graph by Mongabay Indonesia. Indonesia, 2022.
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