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Story Publication logo December 4, 2019

The Chimane of Maraca'tunsi and Their Stolen Holy Mount (Spanish)

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Image by Manuel Seoane. Bolivia, 2019.
English

With a sign that reads "Chimán, Mojeño, Yuracaré and Movima Indigenous Territory," the eviction of...

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Maraca'tunsi community members walk the airstrip that enabled the San Ambrosio company in the middle of the Benyan Amazon. Image by Manuel Seoane. Bolivia, 2019.
Maraca'tunsi community members walk the airstrip that enabled the San Ambrosio company in the middle of the Benyan Amazon. Image by Manuel Seoane. Bolivia, 2019.

"How long is the track?" asks Casimiro Canchi Tamo, a member of the Chimane community.

"About 700 meters," answers Santos Canchi, his cousin, while walking through a vast, deforested space in the middle of the forest, a bit over half an hour from Maraca'tunsi, one of the Tsimané communities in San Ignacio de Moxos, Beni.

"Planes arrived every once in a while?"

"Once a month, it brought goods."

"Until what year did they come?"

"Until 2010," explains Santos, who is mayor of Maraca'tunsi. The planes belonged to a sawmill owned by San Ambrosio, a company that arrived in the 1990s to exploit forest resources and sought to make the transport of food, personnel, and supplies easier with a landing strip in the middle of Bolivia's Amazon.

To read the full story in Spanish, visit the Agencia de Noticias Fides website.

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